Ordinary folk; extraordinary meeting

A little piece of history was made on 24 October 2013 – the tenants of Bushbury Hill voted at an extra ordinary general meeting of their EMB, to serve their council landlord with notice that they wish to make use of the Right to Transfer Regulations.  They are one of the first, if not the first, tenant groups in the country to take this step.

Why was this necessary?

All the tenants in Bushbury Hill have ever wanted is the opportunity to explore the potential benefits of tenant led stock transfer.  This is a reasonable request, they have a 20 year history of effective tenant activism and 15 years very successfully managing their own homes.  They are experienced and knowledgable enough to make an informed decision, but sadly the council has refused to co-operate even with this initial investigation.  It has taken 10 years and primary legislation to get to this point.

The Proposal Notice

Whilst the decision to serve a Proposal Notice on the council is just the first step on a long journey, the RTT regulations surrounding it are quite exacting, but for good reason.  They are designed to prevent a small group of people, who might be unrepresentative, proposing a scheme that has no popular support or prospect of success.

To serve a Proposal Notice you must have a properly constituted Tenant Group with at least 20% of tenants as members and a majority must be secure tenants.  The decision to serve the notice must be taken at a general meeting of the group and all tenants, members or not must be notified of what is happening.

For the tenants of Bushbury Hill these requirements were no obstacle, it has excellent local support – over 80% of households have at least one member of the EMB.  It also has the trust and support of the tenants, in a continuation ballot this August there was a 95% vote in favour of keeping the EMB.

Tenant empowerment in action

It is the tenant led nature of the Right to Transfer process that makes it a powerful tool for community empowerment, by definition it comes from the bottom up.  RTT proposals can only be initiated by tenants acting together.  Rather than decisions being taken behind closed doors by the ruling party of local government administrations, they are taken by tenants in an open process.   Well informed tenants are more likely to get decisions about what is good for them and their communities right because they know better than anyone else what the key issues are.

I found it really inspiring to see so many tenants come out on an October evening (fortunately a mild and dry one) to find out more about the Right to Transfer (RTT) and express their view.

Informed decision making

Tenant led stock transfer is a pretty arcane subject, it’s a minority pursuit even in the housing sector.  Last night, people listened carefully to the case for serving the Proposal Notice and asked the pertinent questions including:

“Will my rent go up?”

“What happens if it all goes wrong with the new landlord?”

“What if the council refuses to co-operate?”

“Where does the money for investment come from?”

Those tenants understood the issues, this was no rubber stamp.  Some had arrived with a healthy skepticism about the whole thing but with open minds.  Once they heard the reasons for wanting to pursue RTT and that they were being asked to support serving the Proposal Notice and no more, the tenants voted overwhelmingly in favour.

So the tenants of Bushbury Hill have finally made it to the launch pad, the countdown has begun all they need now is for the RTT regulations to be laid in Parliament and the engines can finally be fired.

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